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Monday, November 23, 2020 | History

1 edition of The physiology of ethylene production by citrus peel tissue found in the catalog.

The physiology of ethylene production by citrus peel tissue

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  • 19 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Plants,
  • Citrus fruits,
  • Effect of ethylene on,
  • Physiology

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesEthylene production by citrus peel tissue.
    Statementby Kathleen Brown Evensen
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, 76 leaves :
    Number of Pages76
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25936372M
    OCLC/WorldCa4803085

    Ethylene production from intact fingers was monitored every day, and then fingers were separated into pulp and peel tissues. The pulp tissues adhering to the peel were removed as much as possible using a razor blade. Ethylene production from each tissue was determined after 1 h incubation in air to remove pre-existing ethylene in the tissues. role in citrus fruit physiology. First is the effect of exogenous ethylene on wound-in-duced ethylene. Exposure of citrus peel discs to ethylene results in the inhibition of wound-induced ethylene, the result of a suppression of ACC, the immediate precursor of ethylene (Riov and Yang, ), and suppression of ACC synthase messenger RNA (Mullins. Citrus is a genus of flowering trees and shrubs in the rue family, in the genus produce citrus fruits, including important crops such as oranges, lemons, grapefruits, pomelos, and genus Citrus is native to South Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Melanesia, and s citrus species have been utilized and domesticated by indigenous cultures in these areas.


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The physiology of ethylene production by citrus peel tissue by Kathleen Brown Evensen Download PDF EPUB FB2

The physiology of ethylene production by citrus peel tissue / Related Titles. Related/Analytical: Ethylene production by citrus peel tissue. Evensen, Kathleen Brown, Type. Book Material. Published material. Publication info. Notes: Thesis--University of Florida.

Subjects. The physiology of ethylene production by citrus peel tissue Added title page title: Ethylene production by citrus peel tissue Creator: Evensen, Kathleen Brown, Publication Date: Language: English Physical Description: vi, 76 leaves: graphs ; 28 cm.

Topics: Citrus fruits, Dissertations, Academic, Effect of ethylene on, FU, Horticultural Science, Horticultural Science thesis : Kathleen Brown Evensen. Plant Physiol. Vol. 45, FIG. Ethylene induced by catechol. Five plugs of green peel of Shamouti orange fruit were incubated in 2 ml of different concentra- tions ofcatechol solutions in Mphosphate buffer, pH, in ml sealed flasks.

Ethylene was determined after 20 hr of incubation at 20C, anddata are averages ofthree experiments. tion by the green peel plugs, whereas p-cresol Cited by: 6. In contrast, in wounded leaf discs, ethylene production is stimulated by light.

The effect of light on wounded leaf discs has been studied by using an in vitro system which mimics the loss of Author: Yoram Fuchs. The data indicate that autoinhibition of ethylene production in citrus flavede discs results from suppression of ACC formation through repression of the synthesis of ACC synthase and inhibition of its activity.

You are going to email the following Autoinhibition. Ethylene formation was markedly accelerated by the application of abscisic acid but markedly delayed by 3,5-dibromohydroxybenzoic acid. Both the stimulation and retardation decreased greatly during the course of incubation. Both compounds seem to be associated with the early stages of ethylene formation by wounded citrus fruit tissues.

Transcriptomic profiling of citrus fruit peel tissues reveals fundamental effects of phenylpropanoids and ethylene on induced resistance The involvement of both phenylpropanoid and ethylene pathways was confirmed by examining changes in gene expression and ethylene production in elicited citrus fruit.

Plant Physiology and Biochemistry. Consequently, polygalacturonase activation in fruit peel tissue, in particular, may be listed as a factor that induces changes that facilitate boil‐peeling. It is, however, necessary to study the effects of ethylene on fruit peel tissue by various analyses involving chemistry, gene expression, and immunohistochemistry.

Isolated albedo tissue of Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marcovitch, cv. Owari) fruit produced a large quantity of ethylene during incubation at 26 C in the dark.

When sliced, albedo tissue began producing ethylene at an increasing rate until a maximum was reached after incubation for about 30 hours. Aged albedo discs which were capable of producing ethylene, actively converted l-[ U C.

In induced ethylene-producing systems such as auxin-treated tissues, wounded tissues or ripening fruits, comparison of the rates of ethylene production and the endogenous ACC content revealed that the endogenous level of ACC is a primary determinant of the rate of ethylene production from tissues [ 31–33 ]; the ACC-forming reaction is the rate-limiting step of ethylene biosynthesis.

Exogenous ethylene stimulates PAL activity in the flavedo of intact mature grapefruits (half maximum stimulation at 15 ppm); such activity rapidly decreases when fruit is removed from the ethylene containing atmosphere.

Carbon dioxide inhibits both ethylene production and PAL activity of discs; exogenous ethylene only partly relieves PAL inhibition.

The data indicate that autoinhibition of ethylene production in citrus flavede discs results from suppression of ACC formation through repression of the synthesis of ACC synthase and inhibition of its activity.

Ethylene Production by Citrus Fruit Peel. Stimulation by Phenol Derivatives 1, 2. Uritani I. Properties of polyphenol oxidases produced in sweet potato tissue after wounding. Arch Biochem Biophys. Nov; (2)– Mapson LW, Wardale DA.

Biosynthesis of ethylene. Enzymes involved in its formation from methional. Biochem J. Summary. Fermentative conditions for the production of ethylene by the fungus Penicillium digitatum during its growth on citrus fruit peel — the waste product of the citrus juice industry — were studied and optimized for maximum production.

Different isolates of the fungus differed markedly in their ability to produce ethylene in liquid culture or when incubated on fruit and fruit peel. Although ethylene production hasbeenreported forflow- ers,seeds, roots, tubers, andleaves ofmanyplants (6,13, 17,18),datarelating ethylene production tothehumidity underwhichtheplant tissue.

The discovery of the plant hormone ethylene was stunning—ethylene is a simple gas. Our expanding knowledge of the multiplicity of ethylene’s roles in plant development, physiology, and metabolism makes the study of this plant hormone increasingly compelling.

Elucidation of the genetic regulation of ethylene biosynthesis, characterization of ethylene receptors and analysis of the. Xanthomonas citri produced ethylene in the liquid cultures at an early stage of growth, i.e. 3 to 6 h after inoculation.

Ethylene production ceased 9 h after inoculation. This pattern was similar in four different media: peptone-glucose broth, citrus leaf extract and synthetic media supplemented with methionine or cysteine. Ethylene produced by plant tissues grown in vitro may accumulate in large quantities in the culture vessels, particularly from rapidly growing non-differentiated callus or suspension cultures, and hence is likely to influence growth and development in such systems.

Research into this aspect of tissue culture has been sparse, although it has grown recently with the increasing importance of in. Citrus fruit are probably one of the most studied non-climacteric fruits and still the role of ethylene in certain aspects of fruit development is a matter of debate.

In this paper we substantiate the hypothesis that in the flavedo of the fruit, many of the molecular changes associated with maturation of the peel are mediated by ethylene. Citrus fruit are non-climacteric. However, exposure to exogenous ethylene, e.g., during ethylene degreening, stimulates various ripening-related processes in the peel tissue, such as destruction of the green chlorophyll pigments and accumulation of orange/yellow carotenoids.

Citrus fruits grown in the tropics or early varieties grown under subtropical climates tend to reach their commercial maturity while the peel of the fruit is still slightly green and does not develop the specific orange color desired.

Therefore the process of degreening is conducted after harvest to change the color of the fruit to the common yellow or orange color without affecting the.

Ethylene production by citrus peel tissue. By Kathleen Brown Evensen. Abstract (Thesis) Thesis--University of Florida.(Bibliography) Bibliography: leaves (Statement of Responsibility) by Kathleen Brown Evensen by Kathleen Brown Evensen Topics: Citrus fruits -- Physiology (lcsh), Plants -- Effect of ethylene on.

When mature green harvested Shamouti oranges (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) were exposed to 35 μl/liter of ethylene, a 3-fold increase in free abscisic acid (ABA) of the flavedo could be detected after 12 hours and a fold increase after 24 hours, while chlorophyll destruction did not exceed 20%.

The increase in free ABA continued up to 24 hours and leveled off. Eaks IL () Respiratory response ethylene production and response to ethylene of citrus fruit during ontogeny.

Plant Plysiol. [ Links ] Eilati SK, Ilionselise SP, Budowski P () Seasonal development of external color and carotenoid content in the peel of ripening 'Shamouti' oranges.

Soc. Hort. Sci. [ Links ]. Hyodo, H. () Ethylene production by albedo tissue of Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) fruit. Plant Physiology, 59, – PubMed Google Scholar Ismail, M.A. () Seasonal variation in bonding force and abscission of citrus fruit in response to ethylene, ethephon, and cycloheximide.

The wounding of harvested citrus fruit tissues causes important metabolic changes that appear to activate defence responses to protect fruit against infection by pathogenic agents and to cause wound healing.

One of the first responses of citrus fruit to wounding is an increase in ethylene production (Hyodo and Nishino,Lafuente et al., ). Abstract. Isolated albedo tissue of Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marcovitch, cv.

Owari) fruit produced a large quantity of ethylene during incubation at 26 C in the sliced, albedo tissue began producing ethylene at an increasing rate until a maximum was.

A small portion of the ethylene measured in both citrus types was not inhibited by AVG or guanfacine alone (3–16%) and probably reflected a basal level of ethylene production.

Table 1. Effects of 2 mM AVG or 2 mM guanfacine on ethephon-induced ethylene evolution in mature fruit and leaves of ‘Calamondin’ and ‘Valencia’ orange trees Exogenous ethylene stimulated ethylene production in intact citrus (Citrus sinensisL.

Osbeck cv. “Washington Navel”) leaves and leaf discs following a hour exposure. Studies with leaf discs showed that ethylene production decreased when ethylene was removed by aeration. Excised albedo tissue of citrus fruit (Citrus unshiu and Citrus hassaku) produced ethylene at an increasing rate in response to wounding and aging.

The application of 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACC) enhanced ethylene production in both the fresh and aged tissues, but this increase was greater in the aged tissue than in the fresh tissue.

CsPLDα1 expression was reduced in leaves but unaltered in fruit peel tissue treated with an ethylene-releasing compound (ethephon), or a fruit-specific abscission agent, 5-chloromethylnitro-1H-pyrazole (CMNP). The most notable abscission material that releases ethylene as a result of tissue metabolism is ethephon, or ethrel.

Ethephon is absorbed by the fruit and surrounding tissues, and metabolized to ethylene under the slightly alkaline conditions that exist in cells. In contrast the production of ethylene by infected peel and by P.

digitatum in culture was not affected by ACC, but was markedly inhibited by CuSO4, and, to a lesser extent, by results. Since ethylene production remains very low during the process, changes in the sensitivity of the tissue to the basal ethylene levels may operate.

Furthermore, Abscisic Acid (ABA) has also been shown to be involved in the maturation of Citrus fruits but its role is far from understood. Low-temperature, nonfreezing, storage induces pitting and necrosis in the flavedo tissue of chilling susceptible citrus fruits.

In this study the role of ethylene and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL; EC ) in the cold-induced citrus peel damage has been investigated. It has been shown that increasing PAL activity by applying ethylene at a nonchilling temperature did not cause fruit.

Fruits of different Citrus species display a broad array of color singularities and in many cultivars the peel and the pulp also exhibit different color, envisaging specie-and tissue-specific. Characterization of abscisic Acid-induced ethylene production in citrus leaf and tomato fruit tissues.

Riov J, Dagan E, Goren R, Yang SF. Plant Physiol, 92(1), 01 Jan Cited by 15 articles |. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xv, pages: illustrations ; 24 cm: Contents: Illuminating Gas and Smoke --Ethylene Is Biologically Active --Ethylene Production by Plants --Discovery of the Plant Hormones --Renewed Interest in Ethylene Physiology --Ethylene Analysis and Properties of the Gas --Physical and Chemical Properties --Ethylene Absorbents.

Ripening is a genetically programmed highly coordinated irreversible phenomenon which includes many biochemical changes including tissue softening, pigment changes, aroma and flavour volatile production, reduction in astringency, and many others. Banana is one of mostly consumed fruit crops in the world.

Since banana is a climactic fruit, induced ripening is essential in commercial scale. This book discusses a historical perspective as well as and Senescence / Michael S.

Reid --chapter 13 Ethylene in Fruit Ontogeny and Abscission / Colin J. Brady --chapter 14 Ethylene and Plant Tissue Culture / William L.

Pengelly --chapter 15 Microbial Ethylene Production / Hideo Fukuda --chapter 16 Ethylene in Pathogenesis and. The production of ethylene by plant tissues varies considerably under different conditions.

A surge of ethylene lasting for several hours becomes evident after various tissues, including those of fruits, are bruised or cut, and applications of auxin can cause an increase in ethylene production of two to ten times.Ethylene Production: Mandarins are non-climacteric and do not exhibit a rise in respiration and ethylene associated with ripening.

Ethylene production is typically.